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James Baldwin's 'Go Tell It on the Mountain' - ...
14,90 CHF *
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Seminar paper from the year 2001 in the subject Theology - Miscellaneous, grade: good, University of Leipzig, language: English, abstract: James Arthur Baldwin was born to Emma Berdis Jones and an unknown father on August 2, 1924, in New York City. The fact that he did not know about the identity of his biological father haunted him all his life. Who was to become Baldwin's stepfather was a laborer and Pentecostal preacher who came - as part of the Great Migration - to New York in 1919 'seeking better social conditions and economic opportunities.' (Kenan 1994: 26) After he married her, he began to preach in storefront churches and made a living of a job he had in a bottle factory on Long Island, and although he 'worked steadily, until encroaching age and illness prohibited it', were his wages seldom high enough to feed his big family2, especially during the Great Depression. (Kenan: 27) As described in 'Notes of a Native Son' this situation had contributed to his father's 'intolerable bitterness of spirit.'(Kenan: 88) It was 'unrelieved bitterness and anger' that 'drove [his father] away permanently in 1932.' (Kenan: 27) James was very much influenced and shaped by his stepfather, and the problems that derived from his relationship to him became in my eyes a powerful motor for his poetry writings and determined his future decisions. To his father the young boys intelligence and his interest in books was but a source of danger, for 'the Bible was the only book worth reading.' (Kenan: 29) If it wasn't for Orilla 'Bill' Miller, a white woman from the Midwest who stepped up against his fathers objections, and for Gertrude Ayer, a black principal who encouraged the young boy to write stories, plays and poems, James would have been deprived of a valuable education, because in the Baldwin household 'education was suspect as a tool of the white devils not particularly useful to black men in a racist society that placed so many checks on their ambition.' (Kenan: 31) James Baldwin was brought up 'in a household atmosphere of strict, even suffocating, religiosity' (Kenan: 32) and his father lived 'like a prophet, in such unimaginably close communion with the Lord, that his long silence which were punctuated by moans and hallelujahs and snatches of old songs while he sat at the living room window never seemed strange to us.' (Baldwin 1984: 89)

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 07.07.2020
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From 'Separate but equal' to 'Total equality'?
7,20 € *
zzgl. 3,00 € Versand

Seminar paper from the year 2006 in the subject American Studies - Culture and Applied Geography, grade: 1,3, University of Leipzig (Institut für Amerikanistik), course: African Americans in the United States since the 1960s, 9 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: A local schoolteacher in Clarendon County, South Carolina, pleaded with the school board to create the opportunity for his pupils to be transported to school by public buses. In the district of Columbia, African American parents from a poor background complained about totally overcrowded all black-schools and the resulting low education for their children. In Wilmington, Delaware, African American parents were no longer willing to accept the inferior state of their children's schools, especially in comparison to the far higher standards of the schools for white children, which were exclusively given the opportunity to improve out of the educational dilemma all schools in that state were in before. In Prince Edward County, Virginia, students of the all-black Moton High School decided to strike for their demands for 'facilities equal to those provided to white high school students as required by law' (Peeples). Their school was build for 180 students but used to teach 450 by 1951 and has therefore been ruled inadequate as early as 1947. ' (...) In Topeka, Kansas black parents sought to reverse policies under which their children were traveling to black schools far from home while passing white schools closer to home' (Willie, 30). These five cases were combined to form the base of the lawsuit called Brown v. Board of Education in 1954, which overturned the 'separate but equal' decision of Plessy v. Ferguson from 1896. First of all the attorneys of the Richmond NAACP, Oliver Hill and Spottswood Robinson persuaded the students of Moton High School to turn their energies on challenging school segregation, which at that time was the state of educational law in Virginia, instead of only seeking equal facilities. They told them if they would do so, they would represent them in court. Secondly, some members of the Topeka's local NAACP chapter initiated the case which followed the refusal of Topeka's Board of Education to enroll twenty African American children to all-white schools to end their daily lot of long distance traveling to remote all-black schools. Their thirteen parents, one of them Oliver Brown who then became the major plaintiff, filed a lawsuit on the behalf of that children to ensure them admission to the schools closer to their homes. The district court ruled in favor of the board referring to the 'seperate but equal' decision by the Supreme Court in 1896.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 07.07.2020
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James Baldwin's 'Go Tell It on the Mountain' - ...
11,99 € *
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Seminar paper from the year 2001 in the subject Theology - Miscellaneous, grade: good, University of Leipzig, language: English, abstract: James Arthur Baldwin was born to Emma Berdis Jones and an unknown father on August 2, 1924, in New York City. The fact that he did not know about the identity of his biological father haunted him all his life. Who was to become Baldwin's stepfather was a laborer and Pentecostal preacher who came - as part of the Great Migration - to New York in 1919 'seeking better social conditions and economic opportunities.' (Kenan 1994: 26) After he married her, he began to preach in storefront churches and made a living of a job he had in a bottle factory on Long Island, and although he 'worked steadily, until encroaching age and illness prohibited it', were his wages seldom high enough to feed his big family2, especially during the Great Depression. (Kenan: 27) As described in 'Notes of a Native Son' this situation had contributed to his father's 'intolerable bitterness of spirit.'(Kenan: 88) It was 'unrelieved bitterness and anger' that 'drove [his father] away permanently in 1932.' (Kenan: 27) James was very much influenced and shaped by his stepfather, and the problems that derived from his relationship to him became in my eyes a powerful motor for his poetry writings and determined his future decisions. To his father the young boys intelligence and his interest in books was but a source of danger, for 'the Bible was the only book worth reading.' (Kenan: 29) If it wasn't for Orilla 'Bill' Miller, a white woman from the Midwest who stepped up against his fathers objections, and for Gertrude Ayer, a black principal who encouraged the young boy to write stories, plays and poems, James would have been deprived of a valuable education, because in the Baldwin household 'education was suspect as a tool of the white devils not particularly useful to black men in a racist society that placed so many checks on their ambition.' (Kenan: 31) James Baldwin was brought up 'in a household atmosphere of strict, even suffocating, religiosity' (Kenan: 32) and his father lived 'like a prophet, in such unimaginably close communion with the Lord, that his long silence which were punctuated by moans and hallelujahs and snatches of old songs while he sat at the living room window never seemed strange to us.' (Baldwin 1984: 89)

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 07.07.2020
Zum Angebot